September/October Parenting & Prevention Newsletter

Chemical Health
Trend Corner:

E-Cig marketed to be used for inhaling “Vaping “vitamins.

Don’t Listen to E-Cig Companies that Claim you can Vape Vitamins by Adrianne Jeffries Aug 28, 2014
“Vitamin-enhanced vapor is all the rage in the loosely regulated e-cig industry.
Too bad it doesn’t work”
Inhalation is also an inefficient way to ingest vitamins, says John Newsam, a chemist with Tioga Research and a member of the American Chemical Society (ACS), because the particles must be very small in order to travel deep into the lungs where there is close contact with blood vessels.

That means even less than the measly 1 IU of Vitamin A in a VitaCig will actually make it into your body. The little bit that does is more likely to enter through the mucous membranes in your mouth rather than through the lungs, contrary to claims on VitaCig’s website.Furthermore, vitamins can change their chemical composition when heated, which could cause them to lose their potency or degrade into something harmful, says Portland State University professor and ACS member James Pankow.
Although the company’s website is splashed with a giant banner that says “Vitamin Electronic Cigarette” and much of the marketing materials discuss vitamins, CEO Mark Linkhorst says the “vita” does not stand for “vitamin.” “Vita is ‘life’ in Latin,” he tells The Verge.
VitaCig never says explicitly that vaping vitamins will make you healthy. Everything is implied. The company also lumps aroma additives into the same “supplemental facts” list as vitamins, implying they have health benefits.”We’re not claiming that this is in any way a way to consume vitamins and to be healthier,” he says. “It’s just an ingredient added to an e-liquid, of which there’s thousands out there.”

8 Pieces of Parenting Advice from a Teenager to all Parents
AUGUST 13, 2017 BY Kali Venable

1. Remember who you once were.
I imagine it is hard to remember what it was like to be a teenager, especially when that day and age has long since passed. Remember what kinds of things you struggled with, how you handled them and what you would do differently. Share your teenage experience with your son or daughter so he or she can learn from your triumphs and failures.

Remember who you once were…mistakes and all Source: ThinkStock

2. Don’t make your child earn your trust.
There is nothing more frustrating than having to update your mum or dad every two minutes on your location and status. If you make an effort to show your child trust from the start, he or she won’t lie about whereabouts, friends, grades, etc. and in turn, you will have nothing to worry about. It will actually be a win-win situation for both of you because your child won’t have to make up lies and you won’t have to waste time investigating for the truth.
Needless to say, some kids will end up losing parents’ trust by taking advantage of it. If that turns out to be the case with your child, make him or her earn it back.

3. Overreacting.
There is nothing worse than telling your parents something and having them freak out and jump to unnecessary conclusions before you even get a chance to explain yourself. If your daughter tells you she failed her pre-calc quiz, don’t immediately start yelling. Let her tell you what happened: why she did so poorly, how she can improve it or what percentage of her overall grade it will count for. If you start yelling, your child will start to keep things from you, which is the last thing you want.

Accept experimentation. Source: News Limited

4. Experimentation; it’s inevitable.
The amount of firsts enclosed between the ages of 13 and 18 is what makes being a teenager so special. Let your child have firsts and make mistakes, and only make a fuss if he or she is in danger or endangering others. Remember there is a huge difference between experimenting and making habits out of something unhealthy — teach your child that.

5. Challenge your child daily with household responsibilities.
Weirdly enough, one of the few critiques I have for my own parents’ parenting during my teenage years revolves around the lack of responsibilities that were given to me in our household. I didn’t necessarily want to do laundry, load and unload the dishwasher, or cook dinner in high school — no one does. But now that I am about to leave for college, I wish I had gotten used to cleaning up after myself more. Force your kids to get off the couch and help you; they may hate you for it in the moment, but it will establish long-term independence that they’ll look back and thank you for.

Make them do housework Source: Supplied

6. Don’t be a dream-killer.
Let your child dream; encourage him or her to actually pursue dreams.
If your kid shows up with a really crazy opportunity, a leap of faith in a direction you’ve never explored, don’t place your own comfort-zone limitations on him or her. Instead, be happy to see him or her try something you personally wouldn’t. After all, it’s not your life to live.

7. You’re the parent, not the best friend.
You are not 16, so by no means should you be playing a role of one of your child’s friends from school. A lot of my friends in high school had parents who played the friend card. I knew a girl who shared alcohol with her parents. As you can imagine, their relationship was dysfunctional, and her mum was so used to being a friend that she couldn’t create consequences when her daughter made really poor decisions.

Being more of a friend to your kid than a parent takes away all of your authority and creates an unhealthy ideal of nurturing for your child.

Be a parent, not a BFF Source: Supplied

8. Accept and love your child.
I’ve been told that having a kid is the only time in your life that you’ll find yourself loving something or someone, unconditionally. That being said, let your child know every day how much you love him or her.

For me, my parents’ acceptance of who I am has the most profound effect out of all the ways that they choose to show their love. Such absolute acceptance allowed me to develop into a person I find to be genuine, original and happy.

Stress & “Study Drugs”
Partnership for Drug Free Youth Sept., 2017

One of the reasons that teens turn to drugs is to cope with the stress in their lives. We talked to parents, educators, experts and students and asked them questions about the effects that stress has on teens’ risk-taking ability, schoolwork and their family life. Take a look at what they had to say:

Can Stress Influence Your Child’s Risk-Taking Ability?
What are the effects of stress on the brain, and why do students try riskier coping mechanisms like abusing prescription stimulants to alleviate it?

Read more & watch video

Is it Cheating to Use a “Study Drug” to Focus on Schoolwork?
In reality, abusing prescription stimulants, or “study drugs,” actually does not improve teens’ GPA, can be very harmful to their health, and doesn’t teach grit or resilience.

Read more & watch video

Can “Overparenting” Lead Kids to Abuse “Study Drugs”?

Parents want what’s best for their kids. But sometimes getting too involved may start out as a good intention, leading to kids not being able to learn how to problem solve and manage their own time — skills necessary for success in school and life.

Read more & watch video

Tobacco & E-cigarettes

The teen years are a critical window for brain growth and development. As a result,
adolescents are especially at risk from the harms caused by nicotine exposure.
Ongoing use of nicotine can harm brain development during adolescence, a critical time when the brain is still “under construction.” Animal research has found that even in small doses, nicotine exposure in adolescence causes long-lasting changes in brain development. This could have negative implications in young people for learning, memory, attention. Nicotine in e-cigarettes and other tobacco products can also prime the adolescent brain for addiction to not only tobacco, but also substances like illicit drugs.

Read full article here

What You Should Know About Marijuana Concentrates/ Honey Butane Oil
Last Updated: Monday, April 3, 2017

E-cig used for much stronger drugs such as “Dabs”:

The “wax” is used with vaporizers or e-cigarettes or heated in a glass bong. Users prefer using e-cigarettes or vaporizers because it is smokeless, odorless, and easy to hide.

What are Marijuana Concentrates or THC Concentrates?
A marijuana concentrate is a powerful substance that may look like honey or butter. It is made by extracting THC from marijuana. THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) is the psychoactive chemical in marijuana that produces the “high” feeling users seek. Some marijuana concentrates contain 40 to 80 percent THC. Regular marijuana contains THC levels of 15 to 20%.

What are the street names?
Butane Hash Oil (BHO), Honey Oil, Wax, 710, THC Extractions, Budder, Dabs.

How is it made?
One popular extraction method uses butane, a highly flammable solvent, which is put through an extraction tube filed with finely ground marijuana. The residue is a mixture of very concentrated THC and butane. The butane evaporates leaving a sticky liquid known as “wax” or “dab.” This extraction method is dangerous because butane is a very explosive substance. Law enforcement personnel report explosions in houses, apartment buildings and other locations where persons attempted the extraction. Persons with serious burns have gone to hospitals.

How is it used?
The “wax” is used with vaporizers or e-cigarettes or heated in a glass bong. Users prefer using e-cigarettes or vaporizers because it is smokeless, odorless, and easy to hide.
What are the Effects of Using Marijuana Concentrates?
Marijuana concentrates have a much higher level of THC. The effects of using may be more severe, both psychologically and physically.